Category Archive News

Practice Closed for Summer Bank Holiday

Please note that our Practice will be closed for the Summer Bank Holiday on Monday 26 August 2019. We will re-open as normal on Tuesday 27 August 2019.

If during this time you require medical advice or treatment you can:

Visit your pharmacy
Your local pharmacy can provide confidential, expert advice and treatment for a range of common illnesses and complaints. Opening times for local Pharmacies can be downloaded or you can visit NHS Choices.

Access NHS 111
If you need urgent medical advice but your condition is not life threatening, you can access NHS 111 24 hours a day, 365 days a year, either online or via phone.

To access the service online simply visit 111.nhs.uk, enter your age, sex, postcode and main symptom, and then you will be guided through a series of questions about your health problems.

To access the service via phone, simply dial 111 from any mobile or landline free of charge and you will be put through to an operator who will run through a few questions regarding your health problem in order to get you the right care.

A&E or 999
For a genuine medical emergency including; loss of consciousness, acute confused state and fits that are not stopping, persistent and or/severe chest pain, breathing difficulties, severe bleeding that cannot be stopped call 999 or go to your nearest A&E.

Adventuring abroad this Summer? Do you require travel vaccinations for your destination?

If you are adventuring abroad for your Summer holiday this year, depending on where you are going you may need to be vaccinated against some serious diseases found in other parts of the world.

In the UK, childhood vaccinations protect you against a number of diseases, but don’t cover most of the infectious diseases found overseas. If you are unsure what vaccinations, if any, you need for your holiday, you can check the Fit to Travel website and the Travel Health Pro website to find out more.

You can also speak to your GP Practice receptionist who will advise you who you need to book an appointment with to discuss your travel vaccination requirements.

Please be aware that it is best to look into this approximately 8 weeks before you are due to travel as some vaccines are required to be given well in advance to allow your body to develop immunity.

Please note that not all vaccinations are available free on the NHS, even if they’re recommended for travel to a certain area. For more information you can visit the NHS Choices Website.

Have trust in your GP surgery receptionist

GPs across South Cheshire and Vale Royal are urging us to talk to their receptionist, to make sure you get the right help, which may not necessarily be from your GP surgery.

Services are constantly changing and, in many circumstances, your GP may not be the best person you need to see. 

Reception teams across South Cheshire and Vale Royal have undertaken additional special training to make sure you can get to the right Healthcare Professional to treat your needs.

This is called ‘Care Navigation’, where your receptionist or care navigator will ask why you are contacting the practice, to make sure you get the right care sooner.

Dr Annabel London, GP and Clinical Lead for Primary Care at NHS South Cheshire Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) and NHS Vale Royal CCG, said: “My main message is to have trust in your receptionist, they’re bound by the same rules of confidentiality as I am, so they’re not asking questions to be nosey.

“Through the specialist training, they will be able to direct you to the best person or service who can treat your condition or help with the reason why you’re calling.

“An example would be back pain – if you ask for a GP appointment but don’t say why, you could wait to see your GP. When you see your GP they would direct you to self-refer to a physiotherapist as the best person to treat your condition.  With Care Navigation, if you tell the care navigator a few of your symptoms, they can advise you how to self refer straight to physiotherapy without waiting to see a GP to be aware of this.  

“You get the treatment you need sooner, allowing a GP appointment to be used by a patient who can only see a GP.”

The Care Navigator might suggest you see an alternative health care professional such as:

  • a Dentist
  • a Midwife from the local Maternity Services
  • a Pharmacist from your Community Pharmacy
  • a Physiotherapist
  • a Clinician from Sexual Health
  • other local support services

Care navigators will continue to receive ongoing training to support them in developing their role and skills.

Dr London added: “Please, help us to help you by answering the questions from the care navigator get you the right care in the right place and at the right time.”

Don’t Let Embarrassment Stop You from Getting Your Smear Test!

This week is Cervical Cancer Prevention week, a week dedicated to reminding ladies to book their smear tests and not to be embarrassed about the process.

Cervical screening prevents 75% of cervical cancers from developing, yet one in four women in the UK don’t attend.

Cervical Screening is the method of detecting abnormal cells on the cervix. Being screened regularly means any abnormal changes in the cells can be identified and if necessary, treated to stop cancer developing.

All women in the UK aged 25 to 49 are invited for a screening test every three years and those aged 50 to 64 are invited every five years.

What happens when you go for your cervical screening?

The screening test usually takes around 5 minutes to carry out.

You’ll be asked to undress from the waist down and lie on a couch, although you can remain fully dressed if you are wearing a loose skirt/dress.

The nurse or doctor will gently put an instrument called a speculum into your vagina, this holds the walls of the vagina open so the cervix can be seen.

The nurse or doctor will then use a small soft brush to gently collect some cells from the surface of your cervix. Although the procedure can be a little uncomfortable, it shouldn’t be painful. However, if you do find it painful let the doctor or nurse know as they may be able to reduce your discomfort.

Once the sample is taken, the doctor or nurse will close the curtain allowing you to dress whilst they prepare the sample to be sent off to the laboratory.

The cell sample is then sent off to a laboratory for analysis and you should receive the result within 2 weeks.

Many women are nervous and embarrassed about the process of cervical screening, but there is no need to be, nurses and doctors carry out these tests every day.
You can minimise your worries when you book your appointment by requesting a female nurse or doctor to carry out the test. You are also welcome to bring a chaperone to your appointment too.

More information about cervical screening can be found at:
NHS Choices website 
Jo’s Cervical Cancer Trust

Stay Warm and Well During the Cold Snap

With the cold weather setting in this week, it’s important to take extra care to make sure you stay fit and healthy. Those with long-term respiratory problems need to take extra care as the damp, cold conditions can make you more vulnerable to catching those pesky winter bugs.

If you start to feel unwell, even if it’s a cough or a cold, don’t wait until it gets more serious. Seek advice from your Pharmacist.

Follow these simple tips below to help you and your loved ones to stay fit and well over this cold snap.

  • Try and keep your home heated to at least 18C.
  • Draw your curtains at dusk and keep doors closed to block out draughts
  • Wear several layers of clothes rather than 1 chunky layer. Clothes made from cotton, wool or fleecy fibres help to maintain body heat.
  • Have at least one hot meal a day. Eating regularly helps keep you warm.
  • Have hot drinks regularly throughout the day.
  • Stay active – even moderate exercise can help keep you warm.
  • Wrap a scarf loosely around your mouth, wear a hat and shoes with good grip when outdoors.
  • If you have a heart or respiratory problem, stay indoors during very cold weather.
  • Check in on elderly relatives and neighbours. If you are concerned about a relative or an elderly neighbour, contact your local council or ring the Age UK helpline on 0800 00 99 66.

If you need help with heating costs, you may be able to claim financial and practical help with heating your home. Grants available include the Winter Fuel Payment and the Cold Weather Payment.

Get Your Flu Jab Following Rise in Cases

There has been a rise in the number of flu cases in the local area, therefore we are urging patients living in South Cheshire and Vale Royal that it is not too late to get their flu vaccination.

Latest reports from Public Health England show that flu is now circulating in the local area and a small but growing number of cases have been confirmed by Leighton Hospital in Crewe.

A flu vaccine is available free of charge for anyone over the age of 65, pregnant women, those with a serious long-term health condition, those living in a long-stay residential care home, and those who receive a carer’s allowance/are the main carer for an elderly or disabled person.

If you are eligible for the flu vaccine on the NHS, contact your GP Practice now to book.

NHS 111 Now Available Online

NHS 111 is now available online, providing people with fast and convenient access to urgent health advice digitally.

NHS 111 online offers people an alternative to the 111 phone service, as well as helping to manage increasing demand on the telephone service – but please note it does not replace the phone service.

How does it work

To access the service simply visit 111.nhs.uk, enter your age, sex, postcode and main symptom, and then you will be guided through a series of questions about your health problems.

At the end of the questions you will be given advice about the best course of action to take next, which could be:

  • information on how to get the right healthcare in your area, including whether you need to see a GP or seek urgent care
  • advice on self-care
  • In most areas, get a call back from a nurse, doctor or other trained health professional if you need it.
NHS 111 Online Advert

Is Your First Aid Kit Ready for Winter?

Now is the perfect time to check your first aid kit is well stocked for Winter to help you and your family self care for minor illnesses and injuries. There are a number of things you can have in your first aid kit for any such eventualities:

  • Thermometer
  • Painkillers such as Paracetamol or Ibuprofen (or infant paracetamol for children)
  • Cough medicine
  • Cold and flu relief drinks or capsules
  • Throat lozenges
  • Diarrhoea relief
  • Antiseptic cream
  • Antihistamine tablets
  • Plasters
  • Tweezers
  • Sterile gauze dressings
  • Bandages
  • Alcohol-free cleansing wipes

Your local Pharmacy is a great place to stock up on all the above items and you can find your nearest one and view their opening hours at NHS Choices.

Please remember to make sure your first aid kit is kept in a cool, dry place out of the reach of children.

Prescription Changes

Please Note:

Future issues of Prescriptions will be for 2 months.

This is with the exception of any Controlled Drug Prescriptions.

If you wish to discuss this please contact the Prescribing Team.

Thank you.