Blog Archive

Children & Young Peoples Out of Hours Advice Line

Cheshire and Wirral NHS Partnership Trust’s children and young peoples out of hours advice line, provides mental health services to children and young people, their families and concerned professionals outside of usual business hours.

All Clinicians you speak to are trained in different backgrounds and have experience and knowledge of a range of mental health difficulties. 

> Are you a young person struggling with your mental health?

> Are you worried about your child’s mental health? 

> Are you an adult working with a young person and are concerned about their mental health?

Contact our advice line for advice, support and resources.

Mon – Fri        5.00pm   – 10.00pm
Weekends     12.00pm – 8.00pm

01244 397644

You can also visit http://www.mymind.org.uk/ to find out more information about children and young peoples mental health services.

You In Mind

YouinMind.org is an online platform helping you find mental health and wellbeing services in Cheshire.

Simple in design and easy to use, YouinMind.org is designed to connect those with mental health needs with local providers and online resources that they would otherwise be unable to find.

Whether you’re looking for professional support like counselling or wish to join a community group to improve your wellbeing, there’s something for everything on our website. Search by condition and postcode to discover suitable services near you.

At YouinMind.org, our goal is to make mental health services in Cheshire more accessible. We know that finding the right support can be a challenge; that’s why our platform is dedicated to signposting you to relevant services.

Our team works closely with local providers to keep our platform up-to-date and to make sure their services reach those that need it. If you run a mental health service, please get in touch so we can include you on our database.

Since launching in May 2017, we have partnered with over 150 providers and list more than 700 mental health services (accurate as of May 2018). We are currently commissioned NHS South Cheshire CCG and NHS Vale Royal CCG and we work in close partnership with NHS West Cheshire and NHS East Cheshire CCG.

Visit YouinMind.org, and find the mental health support you need.

 

Tiredness and Fatigue

Tiredness and Fatigue

Feeling exhausted is so common that it has its own acronym, TATT, which stands for “tired all the time”.

We all feel tired from time to time. The reasons are usually obvious and include:

  • too many late nights
  • long hours spent at work
  • a baby keeping you up at night

But tiredness or exhaustion that goes on for a long time is not normal and can affect your ability to get on and enjoy your life.

Unexplained tiredness is one of the most common reasons for people to see their GP.

Some reasons you could be feeling tired might be:

  • Not getting enough exercise.
    Sitting in one position for long periods of time can sap your energy, even if you’re watching the TV or using the computer. Your body equates the stillness with going to sleep.
  • Poor posture
    A lot of your energy goes on keeping you upright. Your spine can be put out of alignment by bad posture, such as:

-hunching forwards

-lumping in your seat

-cradling your phone

The more out of balance your spine is, the more your muscles have to work to compensate.

  • Constant Worrying

If you’re fretting about something all day long, your heart rate and blood pressure rise, and your muscles tighten, leading to fatigue and aches.

Try: setting aside some time to concentrate on your worries. Try to think of positive solutions, then put the worries out of your mind.

  • Exercising too much

Regular exercise is good for you, but working out intensively every day may not be good for your energy levels, especially if you’re a beginner or trying to get back in shape.

Try: taking a day off between strenuous bouts of exercise. However, don’t leave more than 2 or 3 days between sessions, or you might fall out of the regular exercise habit.

If you have difficulty falling asleep, a regular bedtime routine will help you wind down and prepare for bed.

Few people manage to stick to strict bedtime routines. This isn’t much of a problem for most people, but for insomniacs, irregular sleeping hours are unhelpful.

Your routine depends on what works for you, but the most important thing is working out a routine and sticking to it.

  • Sleep at regular times
  • Make sure you wind down before bed
  • Try a warm bath before bed
  • Write a ‘to do’ list for the next day to clear your mind of any distractions
  • Read a book or listen to music
  • Make sure your bedroom is dark and between 18°c and 24°c
  • Relaxation exercises such as yoga or light stretches

If you have tried some of the techniques and you still feeling tired or fatigued and are concerned, visit your GP who will ask you questions about your lifestyle and may even decide carry out some simple tests for common issues such as anaemia. 

Depression

Depression

Most people go through periods of feeling down, but when you’re depressed you feel persistently sad for weeks or months, rather than just a few days.

Some people think depression is trivial and not a genuine health condition. They’re wrong – it is a real illness with real symptoms. Depression isn’t a sign of weakness or something you can “snap out of” by “pulling yourself together”.

The good news is that with the right treatment and support, most people with depression can make a full recovery.

Depression word cloud

Depression affects people in different ways and can cause a wide variety of symptoms.

They range from lasting feelings of unhappiness and hopelessness, to losing interest in the things you used to enjoy and feeling very tearful. Many people with depression also have symptoms of anxiety.

There can be physical symptoms too, such as feeling constantly tired, sleeping badly, having no appetite or sex drive, and various aches and pains.

It’s important to seek help from your GP if you think you may be depressed.

Many people wait a long time before seeking help for depression, but it’s best not to delay. The sooner you see a doctor, the sooner you can be on the way to recovery.

Anxiety

Anxiety

Anxiety is a feeling of unease, such as worry or fear, that can be mild or severe.

Everyone has feelings of anxiety at some point in their life – for example, you may feel worried and anxious about sitting an exam, or having a medical test or job interview. During times like these, feeling anxious can be perfectly normal.

However, some people find it hard to control their worries. Their feelings of anxiety are more constant and can often affect their daily lives.

Some symptoms of anxiety can be:

  • feeling restless or worried
  • having trouble concentrating or sleeping
  • dizziness or heart palpitations
Anxiety word cloud

There are many things you can do yourself to try and help reduce your anxiety, such as: 

  • going on a self-help course
  • exercising regularly
  • talking to someone you trust
  • getting enough sleep
  • stopping smoking
  • cutting down on the amount of alcohol and caffeine you drink

Although feelings of anxiety at certain times are completely normal, see your GP if anxiety is affecting your daily life or causing you distress.

Your GP will ask about your symptoms and your worries, fears and emotions to find out if you could have anxiety disorder. 

Mental Health

Mental Health

Mental health can affect anyone at any time and in fact, one in four of us will have problems with our mental health at some point in our lives.

You don’t have to struggle through it alone, there is a wealth of information and support services available to you during this difficult time.

If you need to talk to someone right away, the Samaritans helpline is available 24 hours a day 365 days a year, for people who want to talk in confidence.
Call
116 123 (free).

Mental Health word cloud

Your local Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) has launched a new range of mental health self-help guides which are available online or to download as an app. You can download the app for free by searching for South Cheshire CCG & Vale Royal CCG Self-help Guides in the Apple App Store or Google Play.

NHS Choices has a huge range of information on mental health support, including MoodZone, a directory of mental health helplines and a Mood self-assessment tool.

You should see your GP if:

  • you’ve been feeling depressed for more than a few weeks
  • your anxiety is affecting your daily life

If you’ve had thoughts of self-harming or are feeling suicidal, contact someone you can trust immediately, such as your GP, or a friend or relative.